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THERE ARE BACTERIA AND FUNGI ALL OVER THE SPACE STATION, AND NOW WE KNOW WHAT THEY ARE - Just like on Earth, there is a robust population of bacteria and fungi on the International Space Station (ISS) — and a new study catalogues its exact composition.
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SATELLITE NEWS

EASTER DINNER IS HEADED TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION EASTER DINNER IS HEADED TO THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION - Even astronauts need to do a “big shop” for the Easter holidays. A grocery rocket filled with festive treats blasted off bound for the International Space Station April 17. As many as 800 meals are tucked away on the capsule which took off from Wallops Island, Virginia on Wednesday. They will be dished out over the coming weeks to the six crew currently on board the floating laboratory orbiting 254 miles above the Earth.   More
(Source: New York Post - Apr 19)


KEPLER AND MAGELLAN TO FLY INNOVATIVE SMART RADIATOR DEVICE ON SATELLITE MISSION KEPLER AND MAGELLAN TO FLY INNOVATIVE SMART RADIATOR DEVICE ON SATELLITE MISSION - Kepler Communications ("Kepler"), a Canadian satellite telecommunications provider, and Magellan Aerospace Corporation have signed a Letter of Intention to fly an innovative Smart Radiator Device (SRD) on Kepler's third satellite, scheduled for launch later this year. The unique SRD, designed to significantly improve temperature management on-board future satellites, is being developed by MPB Communications in partnership with Magellan Aerospace.   More
(Source: Space Daily - Apr 18)


ANTARES ROCKET LAUNCHES CYGNUS CARGO SHIP ON MARATHON MISSION FOR NASA ANTARES ROCKET LAUNCHES CYGNUS CARGO SHIP ON MARATHON MISSION FOR NASA - An Antares rocket soared into the afternoon sky over Virginia on Wednesday (April 17) carrying tons of NASA supplies — and 40 intrepid mice — to the International Space Station. The Northrop Grumman Antares rocket and its uncrewed Cygnus spacecraft launched into the cosmos from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility, kicking off a two-day voyage to the space station. Liftoff occurred at 4:46 p.m. EDT (2046 GMT). "A beautiful day, a fantastic launch," NASA's deputy space station program manager Joel Montalbano said after the successful liftoff.   More
(Source: Space.com - Apr 18)


WHY WE NEED TO AVOID MORE ANTI-SATELLITE TESTS WHY WE NEED TO AVOID MORE ANTI-SATELLITE TESTS - India announced three weeks ago that it had joined an “elite club of space powers,” having destroyed one of its own satellites with a hit-to-kill missile defense interceptor. With “Mission Shakti,” India became the fourth country to intentionally destroy a satellite on orbit. Only three other states—the Soviet Union, the United States, and China—have deliberately destroyed orbiting satellites. No state has destroyed another state’s satellite. This extraordinary restraint is worth preserving and expanding.    More
(Source: Space News - Apr 17)


TINY ROBOTS, WEARABLE TECH AND MORE WEIRD SCIENCE WILL LAUNCH TO SPACE STATION WEDNESDAY TINY ROBOTS, WEARABLE TECH AND MORE WEIRD SCIENCE WILL LAUNCH TO SPACE STATION WEDNESDAY - The strange experiments will launch from Virginia this Wednesday. Tomorrow (April 17), Northrop Grumman's Antares rocket will launch its Cygnus spacecraft to the space station, carrying supplies as well as a set of strange and innovative experiments that could support future missions to space. Among them will be two different tiny robots that will practice helping astronauts with space station maintenance; a study that will assess the artery health of astronauts using wearable tech; and a test for a new method for removing carbon dioxide from the air on board the space station...   More
(Source: Space.com - Apr 17)


AMATEUR RADIO IN SPACE PIONEER ASTRONAUT OWEN GARRIOTT, W5LFL, SK AMATEUR RADIO IN SPACE PIONEER ASTRONAUT OWEN GARRIOTT, W5LFL, SK - The US astronaut who pioneered the use of Amateur Radio to make contacts from space — Owen K. Garriott, W5LFL — died April 15 at his home in Huntsville, Alabama. He was 88. Garriott’s ham radio activity ushered in the formal establishment of Amateur Radio in space, first as SAREX — the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment, and later as ARISS — Amateur Radio on the International Space Station. “Owen Garriott was a good friend and an incredible astronaut,” fellow astronaut Buzz Aldrin tweeted. “I have a great sadness as I learn of his passing today. Godspeed Owen.”   More
(Source: ARRL - Apr 16)


TAX DAY 2019 REACHES ASTRONAUTS IN SPACE, TOO TAX DAY 2019 REACHES ASTRONAUTS IN SPACE, TOO - For U.S. citizens, there's no escaping Tax Day — not even if you've left planet Earth. Millions of Americans are expected to have filed their taxes for 2018 by midnight tonight today, and the three NASA astronauts currently living and working at the International Space Station are no exception — even if they are orbiting 250 miles (400 kilometers) from the nearest H&R Block. Tax Day can be a big source of anxiety for those of us who waited until the last minute to get started (you know who you are), but NASA's astronauts are no procrastinators on filing their taxes.    More
(Source: Space.com - Apr 16)


DEBRIS: THE PLASTIC OF THE SKY DEBRIS: THE PLASTIC OF THE SKY - Over recent months, there has been a sudden wave of public awareness relating to the massive and growing problem of plastic in our seas. Mainly thanks to a remarkable BBC documentary featuring Sir David Attenborough highlighting the problem and the ensuing awareness campaigns, plus, the advent of alternatives to plastic. When you think about it, the same analogy can be applied to space with different effects. Our increased dependency on space capabilities demands an understanding of the associated vulnerabilities in what has become an increasingly congested Earth-orbiting space environment.   More
(Source: Via Satellite - Apr 16)


ALTA DEVICES SOLAR ON UPCOMING SATELLITE LAUNCH ALTA DEVICES SOLAR ON UPCOMING SATELLITE LAUNCH - This week, the NG-11 mission will launch from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility carrying the Cygnus cargo spacecraft. This spacecraft will deliver supplies to the International Space Station (ISS) and transport 60 small satellites, called ThinSats, into space. These satellites are powered by Alta Devices gallium arsenide solar cells and will carry various electromagnetic, radiation and inertial sensors for scientific analysis of the atmosphere.   More
(Source: Associated Press - Apr 16)


DIWATA-2 DESIGNATED PHILIPPINES-OSCAR 101 (PO-101) DIWATA-2 DESIGNATED PHILIPPINES-OSCAR 101 (PO-101) - On October 29, 2018, the Diwata-2 microsatellite was launched on a H-IIA launch vehicle from the Tanegashima Space Center, Tanegashima, Japan. Diwata-2 was developed by the University of the Philippines Dillman (UPD) and the Advanced Science and Technology Institute of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST-ASTI) under the PHL-Microsat program (now succeeded by the STAMINA4Space program), and in cooperation with Tohoku University and Hokkaido University.    More
(Source: AMSAT - Apr 14)


WORLD’S LARGEST PLANE, DESIGNED TO CARRY SATELLITE-LOADED ROCKETS, TAKES OFF FOR 1ST TEST FLIGHT WORLD’S LARGEST PLANE, DESIGNED TO CARRY SATELLITE-LOADED ROCKETS, TAKES OFF FOR 1ST TEST FLIGHT - After years of development in the desert north of Los Angeles, a gigantic, six-engined mega jet with the wingspan of an American football field flew Saturday morning for the first time. “We finally did it,” said Stratolaunch Systems CEO Jean Floyd at a news conference from the hangar at Mojave Air & Space Port. “It was an emotional moment to watch this bird take flight.” Stratolaunch, the company founded in 2011 by the late Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, conducted the first test flight of the world’s largest plane.   More
(Source: KTLA - Apr 14)


UNIVERSITIES TO PROVIDE PAYLOADS FOR ISS LAUNCH ON WEDNESDAY UNIVERSITIES TO PROVIDE PAYLOADS FOR ISS LAUNCH ON WEDNESDAY - A team of students and faculty from the University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science is contributing to Wednesday’s launch of the Antares rocket from the Wallops Flight Facility. UVA Engineering students developed a small satellite that will join other satellites, created by Virginia Tech and Old Dominion University, as part of the Virginia CubeSat Constellation, a Virginia Space Grant Consortium project. The CubeSats are designed to take measurements that will help researchers across the country better understand the effects of atmospheric drag on spacecraft and debris that orbit Earth.   More
(Source: Shore Daily News - Apr 14)


AUSTRALIAN CUBESAT TO USE 76 GHZ AUSTRALIAN CUBESAT TO USE 76 GHZ - The IARU Satellite Coordination Panel has announced the amateur radio frequencies for the Australian 76 GHz CubeSat CUAVA-1 that is expected to launch in July 2019. CUAVA-1 is a 3U CubeSat and the first CubeSat project of the new ARC Training Centre for CubeSats, Uncrewed Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), and their Applications (CUAVA), whose primary aim is the education and training of people, mostly PhD students, for the space sector.   More
(Source: AMSAT-UK - Apr 13)


NORTHROP GRUMMAN CARRIES TECHNOLOGY, SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS ON MISSION TO SPACE STATION NORTHROP GRUMMAN CARRIES TECHNOLOGY, SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS ON MISSION TO SPACE STATION - A Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft scheduled to liftoff on April 17 carries supplies and scientific experiments to the International Space Station. It uses a new late load capability that allows time-sensitive experiments to be loaded just 24 hours before liftoff. Previously, all cargo had to be loaded about four days prior to launch, creating challenges for some types of experiments. The launch on the company's Antares rocket departs from Pad-0A of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS) at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia.   More
(Source: Space Daily - Apr 13)


NASA LAUNCH TO HELP STUDY HEALTH, CARRY VIRGINIA STUDENTS' SATELLITES NASA LAUNCH TO HELP STUDY HEALTH, CARRY VIRGINIA STUDENTS' SATELLITES - Officials say the next launch from Virginia's spaceport to the International Space Station will help with more than 40 scientific investigations including into Alzheimer's, hearts, atmospheric carbon dioxide and free-flying robots. News outlets report Northrop Grumman's commercial resupply mission for NASA will lift off Wednesday afternoon from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport. A rocket will take an unmanned spacecraft with about 7,500 pounds of payload (3,400 kilograms) to the ISS.   More
(Source: WHSV - Apr 13)


NEW VIDEO OF INTELSAT 29E SATELLITE REVEALS DRAMATIC “ANOMALY” NEW VIDEO OF INTELSAT 29E SATELLITE REVEALS DRAMATIC “ANOMALY” - After another satellite went out of service in geostationary orbit this week, at least temporarily, new data now suggests the spacecraft may not be recoverable. On Wednesday, the satellite operator Intelsat acknowledged a "service outage" on its Intelsat 29e satellite, which had affected maritime, aeronautical, and wireless operator customers in Latin America, the Caribbean, and North Atlantic. During the incident on Sunday, April 7, the spacecraft's propulsion system "experienced damage that caused a leak of the propellant on board the satellite," Intelsat said. At that time, Intelsat was periodically losing communication with the satellite, but the company was working with its manufacturer, Boeing, to restore the connection.   More
(Source: Ars Technica - Apr 13)


WHEN IT COMES TO SATELLITES, LESS CAN BE MORE WHEN IT COMES TO SATELLITES, LESS CAN BE MORE - For generations, military satellites have been massive, and massively expensive. In recent years, however, an increasing consensus among defense leaders and military analysts has emerged that a new satellite architecture is needed. Rather than rely on a few big satellites, they say, critical military functions — such as intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance or positioning, navigation and timing — could come from swarms of smaller satellites. To ease that transition, they suggest the Department of Defense should work more closely with industry.    More
(Source: C4ISRNet - Apr 12)


INDIAN ANTI-SATELLITE TEST PROVES EARLY TEST FOR SPACE FENCE INDIAN ANTI-SATELLITE TEST PROVES EARLY TEST FOR SPACE FENCE - Still in testing mode, the U.S. Air Force Space Fence on Kwajalein Atoll detected India’s March 27 anti-satellite test and issued a break-up alert. “We happened to be up during an endurance test and we were very excited to see that the system performed nominally,” Matthew Hughes, Lockheed Martin Space Fence and Space Surveillance programs business development manager, told SpaceNews. “Space fence is all about the ability to identify break ups, maneuvers, closely spaced objects, proximity operations, new foreign launches.”   More
(Source: Space News - Apr 12)


SPACEX FALCON HEAVY STICKS TRIPLE ROCKET LANDING WITH 1ST COMMERCIAL LAUNCH SPACEX FALCON HEAVY STICKS TRIPLE ROCKET LANDING WITH 1ST COMMERCIAL LAUNCH - SpaceX's Falcon Heavy successfully launched its first operational mission today (April 11), sticking a triple-rocket landing more than a year after its demo mission catapulted a cherry-red Tesla and a dummy nicknamed Starman into space. The megarocket, dubbed the most powerful launcher in operation, blasted off at 6:35 p.m. EDT (2235 GMT). It lifted off here from the same site that once hosted NASA's Apollo moon missions and its fleet of space shuttles: historic Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. About 34 minutes later, the rocket deployed Arabsat-6A, an advanced communications satellite that will provide internet and communications services to residents of the Middle East, Africa and parts of Europe.    More
(Source: Space.com - Apr 12)


ARISS SSTV TRANSMISSIONS APRIL 11-14 ARISS SSTV TRANSMISSIONS APRIL 11-14 - ARISS Russia is planning Slow Scan Television (SSTV) image transmissions on 145.800 MHz FM from the International Space Station. The transmissions begin Thursday, April 11, 2019 around 18:00 UTC and run continuously until approximately 18:00 UTC on Sunday, April 14, 2019. This event uses a computer in the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ARISS amateur radio station located in the Service Module which employs the Kenwood TM D710E transceiver.   More
(Source: AMSAT-UK - Apr 11)

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